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A How-to Guide to Dealing with Frequently Seen Eye Injuries

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There are many different kinds of eye accidents that can take place, with varying degrees of severity. Some may necessitate emergency treatment and immediate care by an optician, while others can be dealt with at home. Read this guide to typical eye injuries, to figure out your next move following an eye emergency. Keep in mind that general safety measures including wearing protective goggles may be the most effective way to keep your eyes safe.

A corneal abrasion (scratched eye) is not something to take lightly. It can cause serious harm very quickly and possibly result in vision loss. Scratches are generally the result of a poke in the eye, or rubbing the eye when there is dust in it. Since a scratch can make your eye susceptible to bacterial infection it's very important that you visit your optometrist or an emergency room. The best advice for a corneal abrasion is to cover it loosely and to visit your optometrist right away to make sure it is isn't infected. Touching the eye will only cause more harm and patching the eye can give bacteria a place to grow.

Knowing how to proceed if you have been splashed in the eye by a chemical is essential. The first thing to do is put your face beneath a strong flow of lukewarm water for approximately a quarter of an hour. Next contact your eye doctor or an emergency room to see what they suggest for such injuries. Make certain to tell the medical professional precisely what chemical got into your eye and what you've done. If your eye is extremely red or blurry, go immediately to your optometrist or an emergency room after rinsing it with water. Exposure to chemicals in the eye can cause a range of degrees of damage, from minor irritation to serious harm and even blindness.

Though it is sometimes unpleasant to think about an eye injury, it's always good to know how to respond in such emergencies. By being prepared you can be assured that you'll be ready to handle most routine eye problems. Of course, extra safety measures can help you avoid this type of injuries from the get go so speak to your optometrist about preventative eye care !